Pinpoint Gobblers with the Big Hooter Owl Call from Hunter’s Specialties

06925 Hooter

H.S. Big Hooter Owl Call

The new Retro Series Big Hooter Owl Call from Hunter’s Specialties® can help hunters locate those taciturn toms.

The Big Hooter is a reed call with a select maple barrel and chamber for consistent sound and tone. It is easy to use and one of the loudest barred-owl calls on the market. As a part of the World Champion series Retro Calls, the Big Hooter is once again helping hunters put their tags on big gobblers this spring.

The Big Hooter Owl Call sells for a suggested retail price of $16.99.

For more information about other Hunter’s Specialties products, visit www.hunterspec.com, write to 6000 Huntington Court NE, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52402, or call a Consumer Service Specialist at 319-395-0321.

 

How to Regulate Fawn Predation

By Austin Delano

Managing coyotes with a strict trapping regimen ensures higher fawn-survival rates.

Managing coyotes with a strict trapping regimen ensures higher fawn survival rates.

Most people agree with this point: Coyotes are plentiful, and there numbers are increasing almost everywhere. In fact, coyote populations have steadily increased in most areas east of the Mississippi during the last 40 years. With the increase comes blame for issues facing small game and whitetail fawn survival. Like it or not, “song dogs” are here to stay.

Killing as many as possible on your property definitely promotes fawn survival, but you’ll never kill all of them. An argument has been made that you need a few around to keep other smaller predators in check, and there is good research that supports this claim. However, no one likes the idea of coyotes managing their deer herd. Coyotes may not decimate the entire deer population in a given county or state, but they definitely affect small pockets. Your property could be on the hit list. One thing many people don’t realize is that fawning season aligns with coyote birthing season. Fawns are a popular coyote meal, and they make a great way to feed a litter of pups. Continue reading

Rinehart’s R100 Event Scheduled for 15 Stops Across the US

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Pre-registration is now open for Rinehart’s R100 shoot. For 2015, the event visits 15 cities across the US. New this year is “The Dirty Dozen” 12-target competition. All targets are now known yardage, and rangefinders also may be used. The first event opens this weekend in Mount Airy, North Carolina. Find an R100 event near you and get pre-registered today to save $5 right here.

Looking Back

This was my first mature gobbler, taken a decade ago. I've taken over 50 birds since.

This was my first mature gobbler, taken a decade ago. I’ve taken over 50 birds since.

As I plan and prepare for Wisconsin’s upcoming spring turkey season, I reminisce on my first longbeard. Unlike most turkey hunters, I began my turkey obsession with a bow rather than a scatter-gun. I hunted two springs unsuccessfully, and eventually nabbed my first bird by bow–a poult–during a fall hunt. The following spring, three jakes sailed into my decoy spread. I ended the spring by head-shooting one of them. Still, mature gobblers eluded me.

A year later, I committed to hold out for a gobbler. The second morning of the season dawned cold as snowflakes floated toward the ground. My brother Brad and I overslept, so we were late arriving to our spot. We were chilled to the bone when gobbles erupted from the woods bordering our field ambush. Moments later, a duo of gobblers appeared and began approaching our decoys.

Our plastic birds weren’t convincing, so the gobblers hung up at the edge of my effective range. It became evident the pair was going to leave, so I reached full draw, hovered my pin on the closer bird, and released. My arrow dumped the bird in his tracks. The celebration began.

A decade later, I’ve taken more than 50 birds, but I’m crazier than ever about bowhunting turkeys. In fact, I can’t wait to experience my next successful turkey hunt! As predictable as the sun setting in the West, I’ll be tucked away in a blind or a brush pile overlooking a decoy spread just over a month from now.